• Building a Passive House for $163 per Square Foot

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    This superinsulated single-family home in Rhode Island cost $300,420 to build

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  • A Small Town Confronts a Tough Reality: Housing Costs Too Much

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    An affordable Passive House project in New York State is aimed at helping workers crucial to a rural economy stay put

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  • Canada Sees Rise in Passivhaus Multifamilies

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    Low heating bills and modest operating costs make them a good fit for affordable housing

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  • Canada Sees Rise in Passivhaus Multifamilies

    Subtitle: 

    Low heating bills and modest operating costs make them a good fit for affordable housing

    Images: 

    Reduc…

  • World’s Biggest Passivhaus Building Opens

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    The House at Cornell Tech in New York City wins certification and now houses students and faculty

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  • To Prove a Point, Melt Some Ice

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    A second ‘Ice Box Challenge’ aims to show the advantages of building to the Passive House standard

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    Passive HouseA residential building construction standard requiring very low levels of air leakage, very high levels of insulation, and windows with a very low U-factor. Developed in the early 1990s by Bo Adamson and Wolfgang Feist, the standard is now promoted by the Passivhaus Institut in Darmstadt, Germany. To meet the standard, a home must have an infiltration rate no greater than 0.60 AC/H @ 50 pascals, a maximum annual heating energy use of 15 kWh per square meter (4,755 Btu per square foot), a maximum annual cooling energy use of 15 kWh per square meter (1.39 kWh per square foot), and maximum source energy use for all purposes of 120 kWh per square meter (11.1 kWh per square foot). The standard recommends, but does not require, a maximum design heating load of 10 W per square meter and windows with a maximum U-factor of 0.14. The Passivhaus standard was developed for buildings in central and northern Europe; efforts are underway to clarify the best techniques to achieve the standard for buildings in hot climates. advocates in the Pacific Northwest have organized an unusual public demonstration aimed at proving just how much energy can be saved with superinsulation and airtight design, a contest not unlike a county fair come-on where visitors are asked to guess how many pebbles will fit into a one-gallon jar.

    Only in this case it’s how much of an original ton of ice will be left after sitting inside an unrefrigerated building in the middle of summer for several weeks.

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  • To Prove a Point, Melt Some Ice

    Subtitle: 
    A second ‘Ice Box Challenge’ aims to show the advantages of building to the Passive House standard

    Images: 

    Passive HouseA residential building construction standard requiring very low levels of air leakage, very high levels of insulation, and windows with a very low U-factor. Developed in the early 1990s by Bo Adamson and Wolfgang Feist, the standard is now promoted by the Passivhaus Institut in Darmstadt, Germany. To meet the standard, a home must have an infiltration rate no greater than 0.60 AC/H @ 50 pascals, a maximum annual heating energy use of 15 kWh per square meter (4,755 Btu per square foot), a maximum annual cooling energy use of 15 kWh per square meter (1.39 kWh per square foot), and maximum source energy use for all purposes of 120 kWh per square meter (11.1 kWh per square foot). The standard recommends, but does not require, a maximum design heating load of 10 W per square meter and windows with a maximum U-factor of 0.14. The Passivhaus standard was developed for buildings in central and northern Europe; efforts are underway to clarify the best techniques to achieve the standard for buildings in hot climates. advocates in the Pacific Northwest have organized an unusual public demonstration aimed at proving just how much energy can be saved with superinsulation and airtight design, a contest not unlike a county fair come-on where visitors are asked to guess how many pebbles will fit into a one-gallon jar.

    Only in this case it’s how much of an original ton of ice will be left after sitting inside an unrefrigerated building in the middle of summer for several weeks.

    read more

  • To Prove a Point, Melt Some Ice

    Subtitle: 
    A second ‘Ice Box Challenge’ aims to show the advantages of building to the Passive House standard

    Images: 

    Passive HouseA residential building construction standard requiring very low levels of air leakage, very high levels of insulation, and windows with a very low U-factor. Developed in the early 1990s by Bo Adamson and Wolfgang Feist, the standard is now promoted by the Passivhaus Institut in Darmstadt, Germany. To meet the standard, a home must have an infiltration rate no greater than 0.60 AC/H @ 50 pascals, a maximum annual heating energy use of 15 kWh per square meter (4,755 Btu per square foot), a maximum annual cooling energy use of 15 kWh per square meter (1.39 kWh per square foot), and maximum source energy use for all purposes of 120 kWh per square meter (11.1 kWh per square foot). The standard recommends, but does not require, a maximum design heating load of 10 W per square meter and windows with a maximum U-factor of 0.14. The Passivhaus standard was developed for buildings in central and northern Europe; efforts are underway to clarify the best techniques to achieve the standard for buildings in hot climates. advocates in the Pacific Northwest have organized an unusual public demonstration aimed at proving just how much energy can be saved with superinsulation and airtight design, a contest not unlike a county fair come-on where visitors are asked to guess how many pebbles will fit into a one-gallon jar.

    Only in this case it’s how much of an original ton of ice will be left after sitting inside an unrefrigerated building in the middle of summer for several weeks.

    read more

  • Attic Stairs for High-Performance Houses

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    An Austrian company is manufacturing a pull-down stair certified by the Passivhaus Institut

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    A …

  • Attic Stairs for High-Performance Houses

    Subtitle: 

    An Austrian company is manufacturing a pull-down stair certified by the Passivhaus Institut

    Images: 

    A …